Lumières d’Afriques: Meeting with Freddy Tsimba & Nyaba Ouedraogo at the Librairie-Galerie Congo

Thursday 19 November 2015
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo
Crédit photo: Librairie-Galerie Congo

 

Last Thursday, November 19th, the Librairie-Galerie Congo organized a talk with the artists Nyaba Ouedraogo and Freddy Tsimba in the context of the Lumières d’Afriques exhibition. The talk was hosted by Jean-Michel Champault, the artistic director of the exhibition.

 

Nyaba Ouedraogo, a Burkinabé photographer, presented a photograph entitled “Génération C: connexion, communication, culture et création” among the 54 other artists taking part in the exhibition.

 

Nyaba Ouedraogo, a self-taught artist born in 1978 in Burkina Faso, had to abandon a professional sports career after an accident, therefore threw himself into photography. His work, using documentary and aesthetic aspects, confronts the vision of Africa inherited from the colonial era and sheds a new social light on the continent. By placing man at the heart of his reflection, he confronts issues of marginality, poverty and the consequences linked to changing African societies, as well as environmental issues.

 

While Freddy Tsimba, a Congolese sculptor, created a work for Tilder, one of the partners of the exhibition. His work, entitled “Under the Tree of Knowledge” (“Sous l’arbre du Savoir”), is also presented at the exhibition next to the works of the other partners, Schneider Electric Foundation and the Théatre National de Chaillot.

 

Freddy Tsimba is an artist-sculptor from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, born in Kinshasa in 1967. He specialized in monumental sculpture at the Fine Arts Academy in Kinshasa and since then has worked with bronze and cement. He assembles and solders recycled materials (spoons, keys, bullet casings…), and he denounces tragedies of war. Through his expressionist fragmented and provocative work, he reflects on essential questions of humanity. He owes his notoriety to over fifty exhibitions in Africa, Europe, Canada and China. He received many awards and distinctions in France and in Canada.

 

The exhibition Lumières d’Afriques at the Théâtre National de Chaillot is open with free entry until November 24th.